Horticulture

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PLANT & INSECT SAMPLE SUBMISSIONS
For all issues you may email your good quality photos to: gcmghortclinic@gmail.com.  Be sure to include identifying information (your name, etc.).

Submitting Plant Samples for Identification
Please bring in fresh samples in good condition in a sealed plastic bag. If the sample is a small plant, the entire plant is best. You may also email good quality photos, if you feel that would be helpful. For partial samples, it’s best to have leaves attached to twigs or stems. If at all possible have a flower, seed or seed head accompanying it, preferably attached.

Here is an example:

When you drop off your sample, please fill out our Sample Submission form as completely as possible. This will help us with our diagnosis.

 

Submitting Plant Samples for Disease Identification
Please bring in fresh, symptomatic samples in good condition in a sealed plastic bag. The sample needs to be in transition from living to dead. If the sample is a small plant and you feel it’s okay to sacrifice it, the entire plant will be helpful. For partial samples, it’s best to have leaves attached to twigs or stems. You may email good quality photos, if you feel they would be helpful.

Here is an example:

When you drop off your sample, please fill out our Sample Submission form as completely as possible, including what kind of care the plant has received.  This should include watering and fertilizing frequency, and fertilizer types.  Any insecticides or fungicides used should be listed also, and when they were applied.

 

Submitting Turf Samples
Samples should be as fresh as possible. Please cut an approximately 10” piece of sod. It should have the soil, roots, stolons and leaf blades all intact. Enclose it in a plastic bag. Samples need to be from an area where the grass is in transition from green to brown (living to dead).

Here is an example:

When you drop off your sample be sure to fill out our Sample Submission Form as completely as possible, including what kind of care the lawn has received. This would include watering and fertilizing frequency, and what fertilizers were used. Tell us at what height your grass is being mowed. Any insecticides or fungicides used should be listed also, and when they were applied.

 

Submitting Insect Samples
When bringing in an insect sample, it is helpful if you are able to collect more than one insect for evaluation. Crushed, damaged specimens are difficult to identify so try as best you can to collect the insects carefully.

If you cannot bring in your sample within a few days, soft-bodied insects such as caterpillars and aphids can be preserved in rubbing alcohol or hand sanitizer gel.

Here is an example:

Hard insects such as moths, butterflies, beetles, ants, spiders, mites and ticks do not need to be preserved, but they should be handled with care so they don’t bounce around inside the container. Insects should be trapped in clear plastic baggies, clear containers, or glass jars. Do not put specimens on tape. Do not wrap specimens in facial tissues or cotton. Do not subject your samples to rough handling. Do not place specimens in the sun.

Here are some examples:

When you drop off your sample be sure to fill out our Sample Submission Form as completely as possible. Include when you first saw the insect(s), where you saw them, and where you see them now, if applicable. Include an estimate of the number of insects. Include what control measures were used, if any.

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